Festival
Awards

Three headshots of Eva Grant, Romi Kim, and Jasmine Monton.

Programming Disruptor Fellowship:

Eva Grant, Romi Kim, Jasmine "Audder" Monton

ABOUT THIS AWARD

We are grateful to Telefilm Canada, Warner Bros Discovery Access Canada and the BC Arts Council for sponsoring the inaugural Programming Disruptor Fellowship for Emerging BIPOC 2SLGBTQIA+ Film Curators. Heartfelt congratulations and gratitude to Romi Kim, Jasmine “Audder” Monton, and Eva Grant for being a part of the first cohort and an essential part of programming of this Festival.

A person with pale skin and short blonde hair and rectangle glasses stands in a church looking up.

RBC Narrative Change Award:

1946: The Mistranslation That Shifted Culture (USA)

Sharon "Rocky" Roggio

2SLGBTQIA+ identities and Christian beliefs are often in opposition, with many queer-identifying Christians facing judgment or outright rejection from both communities. Sharon Roggio’s fascinating etymological excavation traces the origins of the Christian anti-gay movement back to 1946, when a damaging mistranslation resulted in the first appearance of the word “homosexual” in the Bible, thus providing a “sacred weapon” for the religious right to use against gay people. Significantly, while critical of religious dogma, this documentary does not oppose Christianity. Roggio, herself a lesbian, grew up under the watchful eye of her preacher father, and this personal investment in the relationship between queerness and faith makes for an empathetic film that strives for inclusivity over division. This documentary is essential viewing for everyone regardless of personal beliefs, but particularly important for queer Christians who have been forced to hide their identities in the hope of gaining acceptance.

ABOUT THIS AWARD

We are proud to introduce the RBC Narrative Change Award. Sponsored by RBC, this $5,000 cash prize will be determined by an international jury and will honour a Canadian or International film that uses the power of cultural strategy to overturn outdated narratives, inspire change, and expand the audience’s perception of 2SLGBTQIA+ identities. The award winner will be announced at the Closing Presentation on August 19 and have an encore screening on the last day of the Festival on August 20.

A Black person with a buzz cut in a costume with huge blue tulle wings and pink fishnet top is lit under a spotlight.

Gerry Brunet Memorial Award:

Best British Columbia Short

Tabanca (Canada)

Lauren Marsden

Set in a gloomy Vancouver winter, genderqueer Marlinn misses Carnival season back home in Trinidad—until they discover the power of masquerade within.

ABOUT THIS AWARD

Our annual juried prize for the Festival’s best BC short film was established in 1997 in recognition of Gerry Brunet, a lifelong contributor to the arts and an early board member of Out On Screen. This $2,500 cash prize is generously supported by the Directors Guild of Canada-BC. The winner will also receive a $15,000 camera package prize from Keslow Camera.

A person with long dark hair and large hoop earrings stands in a bar. There is blue light on their face.

People's Choice Award:

Canadian Feature

This Place (Canada)

V.T. Nayani

Saying goodbye to the community of Kahnawà:ke in which she was raised, budding poet Kawenniióhstha arrives in Toronto to attend university and search for the father she never knew. Conversely, Malai, who lives with her brother in Toronto, has just finished university and is anxiously contemplating her next move. Malai’s future planning is put on hold when her alcoholic father unexpectedly returns, forcing the siblings to confront unresolved traumas. One fateful day, Kawenniióhstha and Malai cross paths in a laundromat, and a connection is immediate. With both women facing complex family situations, will their connection find the space it needs to develop into something more? Carefully acknowledging the specificity of cultural experience, V. T. Nayan’s impressive debut deftly uses the framework of a love story to explore themes of identity, displacement, and colonialism within Iranian, Kanien’kehá:ka (Mohawk), and Tamil communities.

ABOUT THIS AWARD

Sponsored by the Canada Media Fund (CMF), this $5,000 cash prize will be presented to the audience’s favourite Canadian Feature. The People’s Choice Awards are determined by audience ballots, and every film screened at the Festival is eligible for one of four awards. Winners are determined by the highest proportion of votes, ensuring all films have the opportunity to be recognized regardless of the size of the theatre they are screened in. To vote, complete your ballot on tablets provided by our staff and volunteers as you leave the theatre or submit a rating for each film you watch on our digital watch platform until August 19.

Close up of a black person with short dreads in a hoodie looking behind them on a dark street.

People's Choice Award:

Canadian Short

Scaring Women at Night (Canada)

Karimah Zakia Issa

Two scared strangers try to escape one another while walking home. Their worlds collide at an intersection, forcing them to question who they’re afraid of and why.

ABOUT THIS AWARD

Sponsored by Panavision, this $20,000 in-kind prize will be presented to the audience’s favourite Canadian Short. The People’s Choice Awards are determined by audience ballots, and every film screened at the Festival is eligible for one of four awards. Winners are determined by the highest proportion of votes, ensuring all films have the opportunity to be recognized regardless of the size of the theatre they are screened in. To vote, complete your ballot on tablets provided by our staff and volunteers as you leave the theatre or submit a rating for each film you watch on our digital watch platform until August 19.

A person with pale skin and short blonde hair and rectangle glasses stands in a church looking up.

People's Choice Award:

International Feature

1946: The Mistranslation That Shifted Culture (USA)

Sharon "Rocky" Roggio

2SLGBTQIA+ identities and Christian beliefs are often in opposition, with many queer-identifying Christians facing judgment or outright rejection from both communities. Sharon Roggio’s fascinating etymological excavation traces the origins of the Christian anti-gay movement back to 1946, when a damaging mistranslation resulted in the first appearance of the word “homosexual” in the Bible, thus providing a “sacred weapon” for the religious right to use against gay people. Significantly, while critical of religious dogma, this documentary does not oppose Christianity. Roggio, herself a lesbian, grew up under the watchful eye of her preacher father, and this personal investment in the relationship between queerness and faith makes for an empathetic film that strives for inclusivity over division. This documentary is essential viewing for everyone regardless of personal beliefs, but particularly important for queer Christians who have been forced to hide their identities in the hope of gaining acceptance.

ABOUT THIS AWARD

This $2,500 cash prize will be presented to the audience’s favourite International Feature. The People’s Choice Awards are determined by audience ballots, and every film screened at the Festival is eligible for one of four awards. Winners are determined by the highest proportion of votes, ensuring all films have the opportunity to be recognized regardless of the size of the theatre they are screened in. To vote, complete your ballot on tablets provided by our staff and volunteers as you leave the theatre or submit a rating for each film you watch on our digital watch platform until August 19.

A young Chinese boy squeezes the cheeks of a white man with a beard who is holding him up and posing for a photo with an older Chinese couple.

People's Choice Award:

International Short

Foreign Uncle (China/USA)

Sining Xiang

Featuring re-enactments from his own family, director Sining Xiang relives the experience of introducing his white American boyfriend to his Chinese family, who are oblivious to their gay relationship.

ABOUT THIS AWARD

This $2,500 cash prize will be presented to the audience’s favourite International Short. The People’s Choice Awards are determined by audience ballots, and every film screened at the Festival is eligible for one of four awards. Winners are determined by the highest proportion of votes, ensuring all films have the opportunity to be recognized regardless of the size of the theatre they are screened in. To vote, complete your ballot on tablets provided by our staff and volunteers as you leave the theatre or submit a rating for each film you watch on our digital watch platform until August 19.